Best Brush for Pugs: Our 2019 Picks for Pug Brushes

Pugs, and even a mixed breed pug like a Puggle, have short and smooth coats. At first glance, one may not think that shedding is an issue with pugs, but they shed frequently.

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The best way to keep a Pug’s shedding under control is by establishing a brushing routine as part of their grooming schedule.

There are dozens of styles and types of dog grooming brushes on the market, and it can be difficult to know which type an ideal Pug brush is. In our guide, we have compiled all of the information you need to help you select the best dog brush for Pugs and a few tips to help you keep your Pug’s coat looking and feeling healthy. We’ll discuss:

We’ll Also Discuss other Pug Grooming Topics…

  • The different popular brush types for Pugs
  • Understanding your Pug’s Coat
  • The overall best brush for a Pug
  • The best Pug matted hair brush
  • Other top-rated brushes for Pugs
  • Frequently asked questions for grooming your Pug

Different Popular Brush Types for Pugs

If you’ve shopped around for dog brushes, you may notice that there are a variety of sizes, styles, and types. While you may be tempted to buy the first dog brush you see, it’s important to note that not all dog brushes are suitable for all breeds or hair types. Before you buy a brush for a Pug, take a closer look at each Pug brush type.

  • Pin brush
  • Slicker brush
  • Bristle brush

Pin Brushes

Pin brushes look similar to the type of brush you might use at home. Pin brushes have wires that are often coated with rubber or plastic (some pins are not coated or have tips. Pin-style brush wires come in a variety of lengths, so it’s a popular brush to use on all breeds, including Pugs.

The wires of a pin brush are flexible, and if you choose the right length, the brush is effective at massaging your Pug’s skin, distributing the natural oils, loosen debris, and brush out loose hair before your Pug sheds the hair out. Many Pug owners choose pin brushes as their favorite “go to” brush.

Slicker Brushes

A Pug slicker brush is the type of brush you’re more likely to use if you’re in search of a Pug matting brush. While Pugs are less prone to mats than other breeds, a slicker brush can help prevent any chance of tangled or matted hair.

A slicker brush comes in all shapes and sizes with a variety of wire lengths. Most slicker brushes have short and stiffer wires that are placed closer together. The design of the brush makes it effective at removing loose hair and preventing the smallest of mats in the hair.

When looking for a slicker-style brush, it’s important to look for one that is comfortable for you to use, such as an ergonomic handle.

Some dogs are sensitive to slicker brushes and find the wires to be a little uncomfortable; it’s essential to find a brush that is easy to control with applying too much pressure. If you’re worried about scratching your Pug’s skin with a slicker brush, select one with tips.

Bristle Brushes

Like pin-style brushes, bristle brushes look similar to some of the bristle type brushes that we might use. While bristle brushes aren’t as popular for Pugs as the slicker or pin-style brushes, many groomers and owners like to use the bristle brush as a finishing brush.

If you select a bristle brush with the right length of bristles, it is another effective way to remove loose hair and help keep your Pug’s coat looking shiny. If you don’t want to purchase a separate bristle brush, there are pin brushes that are double-sided with a bristle brush on the other side of the brush head.

A Note on Brushing Gloves and Deshedding Tools

Some Pug owners like to use grooming gloves or deshedding tools. While we don’t review these grooming tools on our list of best brushes for Pugs, we think it’s important to mention what these tools are and how they work.

A grooming glove comes in a variety of styles and sizes. The purpose of the glove is to put it on your hand, pet your dog, and let the material or bristles do the same work as a dog brush. A grooming brush may be a good alternative for a Pug who doesn’t like brushes (or if you want to get them used to being brushed).

A deshedding tool is designed to reach the undercoat, and the comb is usually stainless steel with fine and tight teeth. The wrong type of deshedding tool may be uncomfortable for your Pug, so always make sure you get the right size for your Pug.

Understanding Your Pug’s Coat

Pugs are known for their “roly-poly” appearance with rolls, wrinkles, and almost comical characteristics. The lovable breed is fairly cuddly, and while their coat is short and coarse, it can feel softer with routine brushing.

Despite their short coat, Pugs shed quite a bit, so regular brushing can help reduce the amount of Pug hair on your clothes, furniture, and other surfaces of your home. Did you know that the type of coat your Pug has is dependent on the color of your Pug?

Pugs have either fawn or black hair. Fawn pugs have a double coat, and pugs with black hair have a single coat, which is typically a finer texture. While pugs with black hair will shed, double-coated pugs are more likely to shed heavily.

Your pug will shed year-round, but the heaviest shedding occurs twice a year (usually spring and fall). Establishing a regular brushing schedule of at least a few times a week can help keep your Pug’s coat looking healthy, shiny, and softer.

A double-coat helps to protect your Pug’s skin and to regulate temperature during cold and warmer weather. While a single-coated Pug will shed, you can expect a fawn colored Pug to shed more, as they are shedding out the undercoat.

Pugs are notorious for being a bit smelly due to all their unique rolls and folds. While you should get in the habit of cleaning the folds of your Pug’s face on a daily basis, your Pug may also benefit from a bath every other week.
Baths will also help to loosen up dead hair and make it easier to brush, so don’t be surprised if your dog seems to shed more after a bath.

When it comes to deciding which type of Pug brush is best, you may decide that you want to use different types of brushes rather than just one. A slicker brush may be the type of brush you use during the heavier shedding months, but you might want a bristle brush for daily brushing or as a finishing brush.

Each brush is effective at grabbing loose hair, but the type of brush you choose will depend on how frequently you brush your Pug and the type of coat they have. One of the great things about high-quality dog brushes is that most of them are reasonably priced, which can make it easy to buy various types.

When selecting a brush for your Pug, make sure that you choose one with bristles or wires that are long enough to reach the undercoat. You may also want to look for a brush with an ergonomic handle and other comfort features.

Overall Best Brush for a Pug

 

There are dozens of brushes that are specifically designed for small breed dogs with short double-coats like Pugs. Whether you have a black or fawn colored Pug, our top pick for best brush for Pugs is great for both single and double-coats.

JW Pet Gripsoft Small Pin Brush

Many of the pin brushes on the market have larger brush heads that may be a little too cumbersome for a small breed dog like a Pug. The JW Pet Gripsoft Pin Brush has tips on the wires to protect your Pug’s skin while the wires massage the skin and remove loose hair, dirt, and debris.

The pin brush has an ergonomic handle with a comfort and anti-slip grip, so that you can comfortably control how much pressure you use without wrist strain or hand cramping.

Pros:

  • Small brush head ideal for Pugs
  • Tipped wires help to avoid scratching your Pug’s skin
  • Comfortable and ergonomic handle

Cons:

  • Need to use every day for optimal results
Read Also: Best Pug Shampoos

Best Pug Matted Hair Brush

While Pugs are less prone to severe matting like other dogs, you may benefit from using a brush that is specially designed for working through mats and tangles.

There are dozens of dog brushes on the market with the claim to remove mats, but some may not be the best option for Pug hair. Here’s our top choice for a brush to help prevent mats.

JW Pet Gripsoft Small Slicker Brush Soft Pin

The JW Pet Gripsoft Slicker Brush has some of the same quality features as the pin brush, but is a great alternative for matted hair and working through tough tangles on the double coat. The small brush head is ideal for a small breed short haired dog like your Pug, and the wires are angled firm, and flexible for a comfortable brushing experience.

Like the pin brush, the slicker has and ergonomic handle with anti-slip and comfort grips to ensure you maintain the right amount of gentle pressure when brushing your Pug.

Pros:

  • A small brush head is ideal for Pugs
  • The wires are angled, firm, and flexible
  • The handle is ergonomic and has anti-slip grips

Cons:

  • No tips on the wires may be uncomfortable for your Pug
  • The brush may irritate sensitive skin
  • Your Pug may need to get used to a pin brush

3 More Top Rated Brushes for Pugs

We love the two choices that we already reviewed, and we think they would be a great option for your Pug, but we also like to make sure that you have options. Here are three more top rated brushes that are ideal for your Pug.

Safari Wire Pin Brush for Dogs

The Safari Wire Pin Brush has long wires that effectively removes loose hair from your Pug’s coat before it sheds all over your clothes and other surfaces. The brush also helps to distribute the natural oils on your Pug’s skin, so with regular use of the brush your Pug’s coat may start to feel and look softer and healthier.

The handle is designed for comfort and a sturdy grip to help you maintain pressure and control while brushing your Pug (without applying too much pressure).

Pros:

  • The pins are long enough for double-coated Pugs
  • Suitable for daily use
  • Comfortable handle and grip

Cons:

  • No tips on the end of the wires
  • The brush head may be too large for your Pug

Four Paws Magic Coat Dual-Sided Combo Brush

The Four Paws Magic Coat Dual-Sided Brush is a great option if you want a pin and bristle brush, but don’t want to have two brushes. The pin brush is effective at removing loose hair and the bristle side does a nice job of smoothing out the coat and stimulating and distributing natural oils.

There are several dual-sided brushes on the market, but the Four Paws Magic Coat brush has higher quality and more durable bristles and wires than others with the same design.

Pros:

  • An effective brush for regular grooming
  • Sturdy wires and bristles
  • Comfort-grip handle

Cons:

  • Wires and bristles may be too stiff for your Pug
  • The brush head may be too large
  • The wires have no tips

Hertzko Self-Cleaning Dog Slicker Brush

The Hertzko Self-Cleaning Slicker Brush is a popular choice for many dog owners due to its quick-release design for removing hair. All you need to do is click the button, so that the bristles retract, and the hair is easy to remove from the wires.

Like other slicker brushes, the wires are effective at collecting the loose hair of the undercoat. As you press the button, you can adjust the length of the bristle and work through any mats or tangles in your Pug’s hair.

Pros:

  • Convenient quick-clean feature
  • Ergonomic handle
  • Good for double-coats

Cons:

  • Pressing the button during brushing may feel awkward
  • Difficult brush to clean due to its design
  • Bristles may bother your Pug’s skin

5 Tips on Brushing your Pug’s Coat

Brushing your Pug can be easy with patience and having a routine schedule, as well as the right tools. Here are some helpful brushing tips.

Tip #1: If your Pug is like most, they love attention and may acclimate to brushing quickly. Brushing your Pug from an early age can make it easier as they get older.

Tip #2: Brushing your Pug every day for a few minutes, or as long as they will tolerate, will help you stay on top of shedding. If you don’t have time to brush, find a time that works best. Take your time and be patient.

Tip #3: When introducing a new type of brush, let your Pug smell it and get used to how it feels. Your Pug may love attention but needs time to adjust.

Tip #4: Don’t forget to brush the neck, chest, back, and even tail of your Pug. It can be easy to focus on the flanks and sides but since your dog is a heavy shedder each area needs attention.

Tip #5: If your Pug is hesitant about brushing, offer praise, small treats, and have short brushing sessions until they become more tolerant to the routine.

FAQ

Have questions about brushing your Pug’s hair? Check out some of these frequently asked questions.

How often should you brush a Pug?

If you have the time in your schedule, your Pug will benefit from being brushed a few minutes every day. You will need to brush at least a few times a week, but once the heavy shedding season arrives it’s best to brush daily.

How do you prevent Pugs hair from matting?

Since Pugs don’t have issues with matting as much as other breeds, you can prevent matted hair by sticking to a regular brushing schedule.

Do Pugs have an undercoat?

As we mentioned earlier, Pugs with fawn-colored hair have double-coats. Double-coated dogs have a thick undercoat and a short outer coat. The undercoat is the part that sheds the most and choosing the right pin or slicker brush can effectively grab loose hair. Select wires or bristles that will reach your Pug’s undercoat.

How to prevent a Pug from shedding so much?

It’s nearly impossible to prevent your Pug from shedding, even if they have a single-coat. The best way to reduce the amount of shedding is to stick with a regular brushing schedule and make sure to choose a brush that reaches the undercoat.

Your Pug may also benefit from Omega fatty acid supplements for a healthier coat, so discuss that option with your vet.

Final Thoughts on Brushing your Pug

Despite your Pug’s short coat, it’s essential to brush your dog regularly. Not only will brushing your Pug keep their coat healthier, but you are less likely to have Pug hair all over your home.

Carlotta Cooper

Carlotta is a long-time contributing editor for the weekly dog show magazine Dog News. She's also the author of The Dog Adoption Bible, the Dog Writers Association of America Adoptashelter.com Award winner for 2013. In addition, she's written Canine Cuisine: 101 Natural Dog Food & Treat Recipes to Make Your Dog Healthy and Happy.

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